Anne's Response to Women's March 'Founders' Response To Alyssa Milano and Theressa Shook

Women's March Founders open letter 121118-.jpg

This Women's March Founders battle goes on, and it's tough for me to see where it ends. My inability to buy into these words puts me on the outs with Women's March leaders, seeing no way back towards unity.

After what I've personally been through with these leaders, the words "As a Black woman, it hurts me to see the recent headlines regarding this movement. While you may think you’re helping, you are tearing a movement that was built on unity apart. This is not the time to strengthen the wedge between white women and people of color" are utter poppycock.

I'm sorry but this is Donald Trump talk #101. These four women wouldn't even allow Hillary Clinton to be one of over 20 honored at the Women's March. Do NOT talk to me about driving wedges, and this is BEFORE I share what has been privately said to me.

There is NOTHING in the quoted paragraph below that represents an olive branch. Rather, it's a reconciliation ceremony in which parties shares their own testimony. In particular white women are supposed to sit quietly and listen.

I support reconciliation ceremonies and Laurene Powell Jobs is investing in the possibility of such an event in America over slavery. She is concerned it will become a horror show only, and is heavily involved with leaders in South Africa who have gone through this process to understand how to make such a reconciliation process successful in America. Her partner in this possibility is New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu.

My focus is saving America from Trump, cultivating a new democracy and also working for women's rights worldwide. There is not an indefinite time horizon on my life, and I am focused on both purpose and results. Decades of my life have focused on racial reconciliation in America and I've done my part. My eye is now on a larger ball -- aligning myself with hundreds/thousands of women of color worldwide who are willing to bury the ax with white women and move forward.

The leaders of the Women's March have no such goal. It's a Sartre play with no way out.

I carry the guilt of racism and slavery every day, even though all four grandparents were European immigrants arriving after the civil war. Nevertheless, hearing racism in my own family loud and clear as a child has made me sick in my heart every day since I was 12. The atrocities white people have committed against people of color in America and worldwide haunt me always. But it's not how I've chosen to lead my own life EVER.

I have a mother who sees no value in me as a person, so that is enough. My firm embrace of people of color has put me at great odds and distance with my own family. Not being a hamster in a cage running around and around, I no longer seek double trouble, or even forgiveness generally from people of color. Reality is what it is.

Growth as a human being moves me away from the hate for white women found in the hearts of the Women's March founders. Their own values and beliefs are their right. But their words and lectures have no impact on me. Everyone knows that I hate hypocrisy more than just about anything. These ladies are drowning in it, and their own actions speak louder than their words.

People much younger than me can sort all this out. I am moving forward on other fronts. ~ Anne

Message of So-Called Reconciliation From Women’s March Founders

"In 2017, the Women’s March was a movement sparked by white women and organized by women of color. The names Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour, Carmen Perez, and Bob Bland were names known in communities of color well before the Women’s March took place. Historically, women of color were used as tools to support the efforts of white women. The Women’s Suffrage Movement was a slap in the face to Black women. We marched with you, we stood with you, we put our lives on the line for you and you threw us away when you felt we were no longer useful to you. After reviewing the actress Alyssa Milano’s recent statements denouncing the leaders, it is clear that history repeats itself. Alyssa, these women are not your enemy. The 52 percent of white women that voted for Donald Trump, and woke up on January 21, 2017, and marched beside you are your enemy. As a Black woman, it hurts me to see the recent headlines regarding this movement. While you may think you’re helping, you are tearing a movement that was built on unity apart. This is not the time to strengthen the wedge between white women and people of color."