Gisele Bundchen Talks Being A Beekeeping Eco-Warrior Lensed By Zee Nunes For Vogue Brazil October 2018

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Supermodel Gisele Bundchen gets up close and personal in the October 2018 issue of Vogue Brazil. In two of her four covers, the Brazilian goddess poses with her mother Vânia and — eureka! — in a beekeeper’s uniform. Pedro Sales styles the Brazilian earth goddess in images by Zee Nunes.

Gisele is a long-time eco-activist, serving as a goodwill ambassador to the UN’s Environment Programme. In her July 2018 Vogue US cover story, the model reveals that gardening and beekeeping are core ways that Gisele focuses on teaching her children — Ben, age eight, and Vivian, age five—to cultivate a close relationship with nature.

While living a very rich life, Gisele only keeps things she truly treasures, like a Balenciaga jacket she’s had since she was 17. Committed to living minimally, Gisele sends to her clothes to her sisters, in order to keep living as minimalist as possible. “People think they need more stuff, but no. Start with the simple principle of waking up in the morning and asking, ‘What makes my life possible?’ It’s such a simple question. The air I breathe, the soil I step on, the food I eat, the water I drink, the sun that makes me happy,” Gisele explains. “If we understand that our survival depends on the Earth and really appreciate all those gifts, maybe we can show a bit more care. Fashion is a trillion-dollar industry. We have the means. We just have to want to do it.”

GlamTribal Design LOVES Bees

AOC has long discussed the plight of honey bees worldwide. And the unique relationship between bees and elephants — elephants are totally terrified of bees — is a major driver in elephant conservation.

These new GlamTribal bee lovers designs celebrate the precious bees in our lives. Remember that 10% of your GlamTribal purchase supports elephant conservation worldwide. Lucy King’s Elephant and Bees project in Kenya shares news about community efforts on the ground — including the evolution from using empty beehives to turn away elephants in Lucy’s original research to the Africa’s farmers becoming beekeepers.