White House Communications Director Hope Hicks Resigns Day After House Intel Committee Testimony

HOPE HICKS DID NOT INDICATE WHAT HER NEXT JOB WOULD BE OR WHEN SHE INTENDED TO LEAVE HER POST AS WHITE HOUSE COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR. CREDIT: LEAH MILLIS/REUTERS

HOPE HICKS DID NOT INDICATE WHAT HER NEXT JOB WOULD BE OR WHEN SHE INTENDED TO LEAVE HER POST AS WHITE HOUSE COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR. CREDIT: LEAH MILLIS/REUTERS

White House Communications Director Hope Hicks Resigns Day After House Intel Committee Testimony

White House communications director Hope Hicks, a close ally of President Trump who has successfully managed his personality, has resigned. Hicks, a brief model and member of Ivanka Trump's fashion pr business team , comes a day after she testified for eight hours before the House Intelligence Committee. A major soundbite from the Hicks testimony was her vague admission that she has occasionally been required to tell white lies, in her work with the Trump administration. Hicks previously met for two days of interviews in December with special counsel Robert Mueller and his team. 

Adidas by Pharrell Williams Hu Holi Blank Collection Makes Powder Colors Street Smart

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Adidas by Pharrell Williams Hu Holi Blank Collection Makes Powder Colors Street Smart

The latest Adidas by Pharrell Williams Hu Holi Blank collection is inspired by the spiritual Holi Festival, one of the most famous celebrations in North-Eastern India, when people gather to celebrate the victory of the good over the bad, as well as marking the beginning of spring. Participants throw colored powders in the air to express their freedom and to bring color into their lives.

The campaign was shot by Viviane Sassen with styling by Jay Massacret. Models include Jeenu Mahadevan, Malik Jalloh, Radhika Nair and more.

Angela Merkel Appears To Tap Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer As Christian Democratic Union Successor

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Angela Merkel Appears To Tap Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer As Christian Democratic Union Successor

The woman basking in the limelight, standing before an adoring crowd having won nearly 99% of the vote for a top post in the most powerful political party in Germany was not Angela Merkel. It was Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, writes The New York Times, who was elected secretary general of Germany's Christian Democratic Union. Dubbed “mini-Merkel” by the German news media, Ms. Kramp-Karrenbauer assumes a post once held by the Chancellor. " In tapping Ms. Kramp-Karrenbauer, she found a candidate widely seen as having the mix of liberalism and conservatism to unite a restive party base," writes The Times.

Severely weakened by a national election held five months ago, Merkel has struggled to cobble together a governing coalition. One of A.K.K.'s first challenges as general secretary will be to restore calm and discipline in a party divided between those who support Merkel's centirst course and those who want to move right.

Kramp-Karrenbauer supported Merkel's decision to open Germany's border in 2015, but took a stronger stance on handling the roughly 7,000 refugees who arrived in her small western state of Saarland, where she has been the governor. The Times writes:

"She had unaccompanied minors arriving without documents undergo medical screenings to help determine their age, and lobbied for Berlin to deport anyone whose application for asylum had been rejected. Male Muslim refugees who refused to accept food from female volunteers should go hungry, she said."

Cindy Crawford Honors Gianni Versace, A True Lover Of Lady Boss, Smart Sensuality Women

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Cindy Crawford Honors Gianni Versace, A True Lover Of Lady Boss, Smart Sensuality Women

Supermodel Cindy Crawford is styled by Karla Welch in 'Versace, Versace, Versace', lensed by Carter Smith for InStyle Magazine March 2018.

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It has long been my contention that the mostly male designers, coupled with women editors, male photographers and male-dominated business interests felt a strong need to metaphorically cut the original supermodels down to size. These women were size 4-6 US Amazonian women who were powerful, sexual and exuded a confidence that the catwalk had never seen. At the time 25% of notoriously overweight American women could achieve a supermodel body with exercise and healthy eating. In recent years, the percentage is 6. 

Twenty-five years after the second wave of feminism culminated in a fiery display of supermodel prowess  -- accused photographer David Bellemere, who seemed to agree with white nationalist Steve Bannon that feminism will destroy 10,000 years of civilization -- broke new ground last week, arguing 50-years later that feminism threatens to pull Western civilization back to the Dark Ages. I do not exaggerate.  

Interviewed in 1990 about the ways in which she and a few other models were calling the shots and changing the game, Linda Evangelista made her infamous, regrettable, sarcastic waking up for 10,000 dollar-bills comment. Still, the spirit of her comment was true. The supers didn't get bossed around much. I doubt that stylists were ever accused of ripping off panties without permission with that 90's goddesses posse. 

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Gianni Versace celebrated strong, Amazonian women whose obvious sensuality was part of their glorious DNA. He was not afraid of female power and influence. In this era of #MeToo, the question of why the fashion industry supported a takedown of the original supermodels is worth considering again. The main argument is that the pendulum of change swung in the direction of the equally wonderful Kate Moss and heroin chic. Change is good, the industry argues. End of the conversation.

It's not at all clear that the fashion industry is as on fire with #MeToo as Hollywood is. How many fashion industry people agree with David Bellemere that #MeToo is taking our celestial, pinnacle-reaching, male-dominated civilization back to the Dark Ages? Exactly why the fashion industry is so far behind Hollywood in embracing #MeToo issues is a question worth asking. What is the industry's relationship with powerful women, whether they are models or brand managers? ~ Anne

 

Fedex Offers Discounts of 18-26% To NRA Members and My GlamTribal Business Pays For It

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As a small biz owner of GlamTribal Jewelry & Gifts -- and now a trial member of Amazon Prime -- I've been shell-shocked over the cost of using Fedex or UPS, rather than 2-day USPS, if the shipment comes over the weekend.

Amazon expects me to absorb a $20 shipping cost on a $48 pair of earrings for a Prime order, and that's w/o an additional charge of about $11 for Fedex to come and get it from me. It's cheaper to just pay the USPS overnight cost of about $20. Note that I must ship 50 orders with only one blip, and I cannot use my own USPS account, even when I know an order will arrive on time. Amazon freezes my ability to use 2-day Priority Mail, which would cost me $12 and no pickup charge. Understandably, as a prime shipment, they want to be able to track all the facts around the shipment. But vendors pay the premium price.

Now I'm reading that if only I was a member of the NRA, I would get discounts of 18-26%. So FedEx is prioritizing gun rights over the success of small entrepreneurs like myself.

I know that FedEx president David L. Cunningham Jr. is a huge contributor to the NRA. But how is it that his personal values support discounts to those who demand unfettered restrictions on military assault rifles, rather than small business owners like myself? Sorry, but that sounds unAmerican and hardly supporting free enterprise.

Why must I underwrite the cost of Fedex shipping military assault weapons, when I'm dedicated to prohibiting assault weapons? Oh, and I also support girls education in Africa and elephant conservation with business revenues. I doubt Fedex is committed to limiting the rights of assault weapons owners to kill elephants and other endangered species. I wonder if Fedex ships trophy hunters' prizes. I'll have to check that policy as most responsible airlines are saying "no go". They give up the revenue.

The majority of small business owners are women. Fedex would rather support military assault weapons murdering men -- 90% of mass killers are men -- than women business owners.

As you can imagine, FedEx and I are now in permanent divorce court, because the company's values are not my values.

I support the second amendment, but it doesn't include military assault rifles, as SC Justice Scalia explained. FedEx doesn't even agree with Scalia, which makes the company's policies ULTRA. ULTRA conservative, far more conservative than the Americans of all political parties who use Fedex for business and personal shipping.

I urge everyone to rethink your relationship with FedEx and whether you believe it's fair that small business owners like myself should be forced to underwrite their support for military assault rifles in our schools. The company says they refuse to bow to the pressure of liberals who are trying to take away gun rights. That's their choice, but we have a choice, too. ~ Anne

Related: Calls to divest from NRA fall on deaf ears at FedEx New York Daily News

Angelina Jolie & John Kerry Talk Women's Rights & Environmental Action In ELLE US March 2018

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Angelina Jolie & John Kerry Talk Women's Rights & Environmental Action In ELLE US March 2018

Superstar Angelina Jolie sits down with former US secretary of state John Kerry to talk March 8, International Women's Day in the March 2018 issue of ELLE US. In truth, they spend as much time talking environmental issues as women's rights, although the two intersect in so many ways. As guest editor of the March 2018 issue of Vogue Australia, Emma Watsonmakes the same point: women suffer more than men as a result of climate change.

At age 42, Angelina Jolie has devoted herself to shedding light on women’s rights and violence against women around the world. Jolie serves as a goodwill ambassador and special envoy to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, where she’s completed nearly 60 field missions, including visits to Lebanon, Jordan, and Iraq. As cofounder of the British government’s Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative, Jolie's met with rape survivors in Rwanda and Bosnia and Herzegovina.